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Tri-Valley CAREs News Clips:   Most Recent  •  2016  • 2015  •  2014  •  2013  •  2012  •  2011 and earlier


Testing Fate: The Implications of Resumed Nuclear Weapons Testing

Friday, July 17, 2017
Source:
Changed Affairs

From 1945 to 1992, the United States conducted 1,032 nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, under the ocean and below ground. These tests took their toll on the environment and communities downwind from test sites, with certain radioactive materials, such as Strontium-90, still measurable in our bodies.

In the quarter century since the last explosive nuclear test, cold war realities like “duck and cover” have faded from the public consciousness. To today’s young professionals, they seem quaint icons of a bygone era. However, while there is no technical requirement for a U.S. nuclear test, this 20th century pursuit is getting new consideration in the current administration. We would be well advised to examine the geopolitical context and the risks that would accompany any U.S. return to testing.

According to the treaty’s “entry into force” provision, it will become fully operational 90 days after achieving its threshold requirement for 50 states to sign and complete its ratification.

This past May, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) embarked on another review cycle to assess its status and implementation. During these negotiations in Vienna, the vast majority of states expressed strong support for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).

Click here to read the full article.


Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty Adopted

July 8, 2017
Source:
KPFA Evening News

TVC's Executive Director Marylia Kelly was interviewed by KPFA Evening News on Saturday, July 8. The topic is the adoption by the UN of the nuclear weapons ban treaty.

Press play to listen to the interview.

Click here to read the blog on the treaty vote.


Nuclear Weapons

June 22, 2017
Source:
The Independent Newspaper

Trump’s budget for 2018 contains an extra billion dollars over the current year for nuclear weapons activities, even as it cuts climate science and weatherization assistance for poor families.

This increase includes developing a new warhead for an ill-advised “Long-Range Stand Off” weapon - able to launch a sneak nuclear attack from thousands of miles away.

Senator Dianne Feinstein noted, “LRSO is a new weapon that by the Pentagon’s own admission would have a role ‘beyond deterrence’. Congress shouldn’t fund dangerous new nuclear weapons designed to fight unwinnable nuclear wars.”

Feinstein and 9 Senate colleagues introduced S.574, The Nuclear Cruise Missile Reconsideration Act, to limit LRSO warhead funding in the coming year to its present level of $220 million. Trump’s budget would boost funds to $399 million.

I call on Senator Kamala Harris to co-sponsor S.574.

I further call on the Trump administration and Congress to cancel LRSO and save taxpayers $30 billion. Overall the warhead will cost $10 billion, with another $20 billion for the cruise missile to deliver it.

Jo Ann Frisch,

Livermore, CA

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Why The Military Is Still Allowed To Use Open Burning And Detonation To Destroy Hazardous Waste Explosives In The U.S.

June 16, 2017
Source:
By Dan Ross, NEWSWEEK Magazine

The Article previously featured on FairWaring.org, on Open Burning-Open Detonation of explosive wastes at Livermore Lab Site 300 and other locations across the country was picked up by NEWSWEEK Magazine. Tri-Valley CAREs is quoted. Check it out.

Click here to read the article...




Alarming Implications

June 8, 2017
Source:
The Independent Newspaper

Trump has taken the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Agreement. What a reckless step backwards! But not surprising from someone who heedlessly rejects the worldwide scientific consensus that human-caused global warming is real threat to humanity.

Trump cites dubious economic figures to justify his decision. His enumeration of future economic costs from Paris Accord restrictions is based on a coal-industry commissioned study. The economic costs of not tackling climate change weren’t mentioned, nor were the economic benefits of developing renewable energy technology.

Trump's espousal of, and apparent reliance on, biased, incomplete and inaccurate information on such a globally critical issue is alarming, and not just about climate change, where we still have some time to reverse course.

But think about nuclear weapons.

Do we really trust Trump’s gut instincts on that? Or the information he chooses to pay attention to? Presently there is no check on the President’s ability to launch a nuclear strike at any time, against any country for any reason.

No single person should have that awesome power. Please urge Congress to pass “The Restricting First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act of 2017,” introduced by Sen. Ed Markey and Rep. Ted Lieu.

Stephanie Ericson,

Dublin, CA

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Open Burning at U.S. Military Sites Inflames Activists in Nearby Towns

May 4, 2017
Source:
By Dan Ross, FairWarning

Article on Open Burning-Open Detonation of explosive wastes at Livermore Lab Site 300 and other locations across the country. Tri-Valley CAREs is quoted. Check it out.

Click here to read the article...




Tri-Valley CAREs staff are interviewed on the evening news about Good Friday protest at Livermore Lab

April 14, 2017
Source:
KPFA Evening News

Tri-Valley CAREs' staff attorney, Scott Yundt, and executive director, Marylia Kelley, are interviewed during the annual Good Friday protest at Livermore Lab regarding the Lab’s role in continued nuclear weapons development and the importance of the action. More than 100 people participated and 28 peace advocates chose to risk arrest in the gates.

Click the link and fast forward to the Good Friday protest, which runs a full 6 minutes beginning at 50 minutes and 12 seconds into the broadcast.

Click here to listen...




Sick LLNL Workers

April 13, 2017
Source:
The Independent - Letter to the Editor by Scott Yundt

Current and former Lawrence Livermore National Lab and Sandia National Lab employees who are suffering from illnesses are potentially eligible to receive up to $400K in compensation, as well as extensive medical benefits. Survivors (spouses, children, grandchildren, step children) of deceased employees who suffered from illnesses (cancers, and others) are also eligible for some compensation, even if the employee died decades ago.

The law is called the Energy Employee Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act and there is a meeting at the Livermore Public Library, (1188 S. Livermore Ave. Community Room A) on Thursday April 20th at noon to discuss how to apply for these benefits, or if you have already applied, how to get your claim approved. All are welcome to join us to learn more about this program. You can call local advocate Scott Yundt to learn more, 925-443-7148.

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"It's a Cover-Up, Not a Clean-Up": Nuclear Waste Smolders in Sites Across the US

March 30, 2017
Source:
by Daniel Ross, Truthout

Renowned wartime journalist Wilfred Burchett described the damage from the atomic bomb that flattened Hiroshima as "far greater than photographs can show." When it comes to the enduring legacy of the Manhattan Project on home soil, the damage to the environment and human health is proving similarly hard to grasp…

…For Marylia Kelley, executive director of Tri-Valley CAREs, any increased spending on the nuclear modernization program at active facilities like the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California has even more troubling implications. She pointed to Trump's heated nuclear rhetoric and the additional NNSA funds in the proposed budget…

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US NUCLEAR WEAPON MODERNIZATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BAN TREATY

March 29, 2017
Source:
by Ralph Hutchinson, Nuclear Ban Daily Vol 1, #3

When the Trump Administration released its “skinny budget” in early March, nuclear weapons programs received the largest percentage increase of any federal agency, an 11.3% increase, indicating an acceleration of the ongoing program to modernize the US nuclear stockpile and production infrastructure.

Those numbers set the tone for the presentation by members of the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability (ANA) on the second day of the ban treaty conference. Rick Wayman of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation moderated a panel that included ANA members Marylia Kelley from Livermore, CA; Jay Coghlan from Albuquerque, NM; Ralph Hutchison from Oak Ridge, TN; they were joined by Matthew McKinzie of the Natural Resources Defense Council and Hans Kristensen of the Federation of American Scientists.

Kelley began by explaining that the US is currently modifying warheads under the “Life Extension Program,” rapidly creating a stockpile “rife with novel military capabilities.” Plans to modify the [W80-4] warhead to ride atop a cruise missile will result in a weapon former Secretary of Defense William Perry calls “uniquely destabilizing.”

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Non-Proliferation

Thursday, March 16, 2017
Source:
The Independent Newspaper

Litigation aimed at achieving U.S. compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty will be heard March 15th in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

The Republic of the Marshall Islands is seeking enforcement of the Treaty’s Article 6, which requires negotiations “in good faith” to achieve the elimination of nuclear weapons. The Treaty will soon celebrate its 47th anniversary. The litigation can clarify steps toward realization of its disarmament goals.

Of particular significance is that new nuclear weapon design activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory illustrate a failure of the U.S. to meet these obligations.

Further, the Marshall Islands was used as the testing ground for 67 nuclear tests conducted by the U.S. from 1946 to 1958, resulting in lasting health and environmental problems. Yet this lawsuit does not seek compensation, rather it demands action for disarmament with the ultimate goal of ending the nuclear threat for all humanity.

Tony de Brum, a special envoy appointed by the President of the Marshall Islands, emphasizes that the Marshallese “have suffered the catastrophic and irreparable damage of these weapons, and we vow to fight so that no one else on earth will ever again experience these atrocities.”

Jo Ann Frisch

Pleasanton

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End Run

Thursday, March 16, 2017
Source:
The Independent Newspaper

The Doomsday Clock will undoubtedly have inched closer to midnight since Tricia Moore’s letter of February 16th. Trump’s first weeks in office have provided appalling demonstrations of this administration’s recklessness and incompetence. Consider the following. While hosting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Mar-a-Lago, he held national security strategy sessions and received confidential security briefings while an army officer carried the “nuclear football” around in plain sight and earshot of paying club members. Trump has expressed his dangerous views on the use of nuclear weapons, including a complete lack of understanding of the nuclear triad, casual threats regarding using nuclear weapons on the battlefield or to combat terrorists and a desire to be “unpredictable” in his use of nuclear weapons. We cannot trust this president to make rational or informed decisions about the safety of our country and the world.

Right now, Trump has unrestricted power to launch thousands of nuclear weapons at will. Fortunately, in January, Sen. Ed Markey and Rep. Ted Lieu introduced the Restricting the First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act (S. 200 & H.R. 669), legislation that would require a congressional declaration of war in order to use nuclear weapons, except in response to an incoming nuclear attack, effectively blocking Trump from starting a nuclear war on a whim or because someone hurts his feelings on Twitter.

We must pressure Congress to take the “nuclear football” away from Trump. Call or write to Rep. Swalwell, and Senators Feinstein and Harris (Congress.org). Ask them to keep us safe, to cosponsor and fully support the Restricting First Use measures. To learn more and get involved, contact Win Without War (winwithoutwar.org), Tri-Valley CAREs (trivalleycares.org), and Tri-Valley STAND (maryqcontrary3@gmail.com). If we don’t resolve this issue, the others may not matter.

Mary Perner

Livermore

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KPFA Interviews TVC's staff attorney Scott Yundt

Broadcast date: March 15, 2017
Source:
KPFA Evening News

Tri-Valley CAREs' staff attorney, Scott Yundt is interviewed by KPFA at the Ninth Circuit Court regarding the Marshall Islands' litigation to compel US compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty and its disarmament obligation.

Click the link and fast forward to the interview, which begins at 37 minutes 49 seconds into the broadcast.

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=255912...




Non-proliferation treaty must be enforced

Tuesday, March 8, 2017
Source:
The Mercury News

Litigation aimed at achieving U.S. compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty will be heard March 15 in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

The Republic of the Marshall Islands is seeking enforcement of the treaty’s Article 6, which requires negotiations “in good faith” to achieve the elimination of nuclear weapons. The treaty will soon celebrate its 47th anniversary. The litigation can clarify steps toward realization of its disarmament goals.

Of particular significance is that new nuclear weapon design activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory illustrate a failure of the United States to meet these obligations.

The Marshall Islands was used as the testing ground for 67 U.S. nuclear tests, yet the litigation demands disarmament rather than compensation. Special envoy for the President of the Marshall Islands, Tony de Brum emphasizes that his people “have suffered the catastrophic and irreparable damage of these weapons, and we vow to fight so that no one else on earth will ever again experience these atrocities.”

Jo Ann Frisch

Pleasanton

Read the full story...




KZFR Radio's Chris Nelson interviews TVC director, Marylia Kelley

Broadcast date: February 23, 2017
Source:
KZFR Radio

Chris Nelson interviews Tri-Valley CAREs' executive director, Marylia Kelley, on nuclear weapons policy in the emergent Trump administration and how public activism can make a difference. Discussion includes the "Restricting First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act of 2017" introduced by Senator Ed Markey and Rep. Ted Lieu, the nuclear weapons "ban treaty" negotiations that will begin at the United Nations on March 27, 2017 and more.

Click the link and fast forward to the interview, which begins at 7 minutes 30 seconds into the broadcast.

http://kzfr.org/broadcasts/8153...




KPFA Evening News, Weekend Edition's David Rosenberg interviews TVC director, Marylia Kelley

Broadcast date: February 11, 2017
Source:
KPFA Evening News, Weekend Edition

David Rosenberg interviews Tri-Valley CAREs' Marylia Kelley about safety issues at the beleaguered nuclear Waste Treatment Plant under construction at the Dept. of Energy's Hanford Reservation in Washington State.

Click in and fast forward to the interview, which begins at 19 minutes 50 seconds into the broadcast.

https://archives.kpfa.org/data/20170211-Sat1800.mp3...




Nuclear Arsenal

Thursday, February 16, 2017
Source:
The Independent Newspaper

I participated in the U.S. and international movements to ban nuclear weapons in the 1980's. Progress was made at that time in the US/Russian commitment to decommission and destroy accumulated nuclear weapons, with the ultimate goal of a world without such weapons.

That commitment to disarm has deteriorated, and the world is now only two and one-half minutes from midnight according to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. They have moved the hands of their iconic Doomsday Clock thirty seconds closer to the nuclear hour that marks the end of humanity.

The Bulletin cited several reasons for the darkening of the global security landscape including deteriorating relations between the US and Russia (together possessing more than 90% of world's nuclear weapons), North Korea's continuing weapons development, the march of arsenal modernization programs in nuclear weapons states, and new doubt over the future of the Iran Nuclear Deal, (though it proved successful in meeting goals in year one.)

These are all matters President Trump has signaled that he would make worse due to "ill-considered comments about expanding and even deploying the US Nuclear arsenal, a troubling propensity to discount or outright reject expert advice about international security, including the conclusions of intelligence experts ," according to the Bulletin. I would add to this list his condoning of fake news and alternative facts.

I think that no problem is more urgent today than the militarization of politics and the new arms race. Stopping and reversing this ruinous nuclear race must be a priority. See trivalleycares.org or wagingpeace.org to take action.

Patricia Moore, MSW

Livermore

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Trump’s tweets raise specter of resumed nuclear tests in Nevada

January 21, 2017
Source:
Las Vegas Review-Journal

It’s been nearly 25 years — 8,887 days, to be precise — since the United States last detonated a nuclear bomb beneath the Nevada desert. A tweet last month by President Donald Trump has many Americans wondering whether that long hiatus is about to end.

Policy experts, scientists and foes of nuclear weapons are divided on the implications of Trump’s Twitter vow last month that the United States will “greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capability” on his watch. Some predict it could signal a rekindled arms race.

But they agree what it would mean if an expansion includes adding new types of weapons to the U.S. nuclear arsenal: the resumption of some form of testing at the Nevada National Security Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

As with many of the new president’s 140-character policy statements, the details of the new administration’s stance on nuclear weapons are not yet clear...

Marylia Kelley, of the San Francisco Bay Area anti-nukes group Tri-Valley Communities Against a Radioactive Environment, is not at all certain that Trump won’t order a resumption of testing, saying the new president’s tweet “worries me.”

“It appears to foreshadow an unfortunate acceleration of a potentially catastrophic new nuclear arms race,” she said.

Noting that the U.S. already has embarked on a 30-year, $1 trillion effort to design, develop and produce new and modified nuclear warheads and delivery systems, she said was frightened to read about a follow-up comment Trump reportedly made to explain his tweet, saying that the U.S. will “outmatch” other countries in the event of an arms race.

“This is dangerous in the extreme — a future in which our children and grandchildren cower under desks in new ‘duck-and-cover’ drills is not a future we should seek,” she said.

Kelley was among the thousands who converged on the Nevada Test Site in the waning years of full-scale nuclear testing to protest and hold vigils at Peace Camp, near the road leading to the Nevada National Security Site’s Mercury entrance. More than 15,740 protesters were arrested there in civil disobedience trespass actions from 1986 through 1994.

If U.S. nuclear weapons testing resumes at any level, Kelley promises a resumption of protests.

“We’ll get the band back together,” she said.

Read the full story...




Tri-Valley CAREs News Clips:   Most Recent  •  2016  • 2015  •  2014  •  2013  •  2012  •  2011 and earlier